During the Australian summer I had this crazy idea to buy a whole box of over ripe nectarines for the sweet price of $5.00. Little did I know how many nectarines I’d actually end up with. This was a few months ago. After a couple of weeks the box was still more than half full and I was finding myself stuck with what to do with these perfectly edible morsels that were fast approaching their expiry date. I did what a ‘normal’ person would do and started to look up ways to use nectarines in cooking. The most fastest way to do so it appeared was (apart from stewing, tarts or making fruit preserve), is to use them in muffins and that’s what I did. I experimented with all sorts of recipes that used nectarines in them in order to find the ‘best’ recipe there was out there.

BNectarine Muffins (5)

 

Best Nectarine muffins

Difficulty: easy Makes: 8-10 muffins

Original recipes and instructions here. ‘Best peach nectarine muffins’ by Georgi on Food.com

This variation of the recipe experiments with substituting/adjusting ingredients a bit while keeping the same portions to  make the muffins healthier somewhat healthier. Unfortunately I was not entirely able to completely substitute the sugar and get the opportunity to try changing the flour content to lets say wholemeal or use other flour alternatives.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups of flour (I substituted with 3/4 cup of oat flour)
  • 3/4 cup of sugar ( I used 1/4 cup of sugar to 1/2 cup of stevia)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 egg room temperature
  • 1/3 cup of milk (of choice)
  • 3 cups nectarine, peeled, pitted and diced

 

Method

1. Preheat oven to 200°C and line muffin tray with 10 paper liners

2. Sift flour, stevia, salt and baking powder in one bowl.

3. Gently whisk oil, egg and milk in another bowl.

4. Mix wet ingredients into the dry and then fold in the fruit

BNectarine Muffins (1b,2a)

5. Fill the paper liners to the top because it is a very wet batter. It does not rise very much at all. Sprinkle the tops with oat flour if desired or sugar or cinnamon sugar.

BNectarine Muffins (2b,3,3a,5)

6. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Let cool in the tins for a few minutes before placing them on a wire rack to cool completely

BNectarine Muffins (4)

Now these muffins were certainly very good. They looked gorgeous. The muffins were soft and had a really fluffy texture even after it had cooled down. From a few hours later to a few days, they were still very soft. As you can see from the images, there wasn’t much rise at all once the muffins had cooled down. In fact some of the muffins began to deflate.

I may have added just a bit too much fruit, (possibly half a cup too much) which may have caused the batter to be ‘heavy’. I would however make these again. Next time I’m going to add a teaspoon of cinnamon to give the muffins a nice aroma and another dimension of flavour. I certainly would not have been able to make only 8 of these according to the original recipe because they would just over fill and look horrible, so dividing it among 10 cupcake liners were a good idea. If I had used parchment paper to line the trays instead, then I probably would have been able to fill them up higher.

 All in all, these were really good and easy to make.

Note:

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3 thoughts on “Best nectarine muffins”

  1. Hi! I just made these muffins over the weekend, and they were delicious! I have just one question however: Does the recipe actually call for an oven temperature of 200? I had to bake them for 45 minutes at 200 and eventually turned the heat up to 375 to speed up the process. I’d like to pass this recipe on to a friend, but wanted to confirm the oven temp before I send!
    Thanks,
    Anna

    1. Hi Anna,

      I’m glad they were delicious. The recipe does call for an oven temperature of 200 degrees Celcius at 15-20mins. If your oven temperature goes by degrees Fahrenheit then when you heated it up to 375-390 degrees, that would be the correct temperature.

      Minty

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